Movie

Fursat: A Movie with a Difference

A scene from Fursat

Fursat is a captivating and thought-provoking short film directed by Vishal Bhardwaj. Though it is just thirty minutes long, it has all the ingredients of a full-length Hindi feature film. It’s a mixture of all the genres like science fiction, romance, action, drama, thriller, musical, fantasy, and mystery.

Fursat tells the tale of Nishant or Nishu (Ishaan Khatter) who has created a supernatural tool called ‘Doordarshak’ which enables him to see the future. He collects the hair of his girlfriend Diya (Wamiqa Gabbi) for DNA to see her future. Diya is a government doctor in Rajasthan. The story moves alternatingly between scenes of Nishant in the future and in the present. His anticipation to see the future, and his anxiety after seeing it, destroys his relationship with Diya.

The film starts with a close shot of Diya. She is in the desert somewhere and has an expression of fear on her face. We see a person charging towards her with a sword in his hand. The situation shifts to Nishant running and finally racing with a train in which she is travelling.

The whole film, reel and real, is an experiment with technology. The entire film is shot with an iPhone 14. It proves that to make a good film, one does not require expensive equipment, a large technical crew and a production team. Wonderfully shot and brilliantly scripted, this short film is a lesson for the young film-makers who have great stories to tell but cannot visually narrate them well.

Vishal Bharadwaj is known for his aesthetic sensibility and has played with the theme of time travel. The cinematography and the musical score are the highlights of the film. Gulzar Sahab’s poetry takes it a notch higher. Meaningful lyrics beautify the flow of the story and also provide the required relevance for understanding the narratives. The two lead actors, played by Ishaan Khatter and Wamiqa Gabbi, deliver powerful performances that are both subtle and nuanced. Their chemistry is palpable, and the dialogue is natural and understated, allowing their performances to shine through.

This kind of movie gives a sneak peep into the new era of film-making where the movie has been beautifully shot in limited sources. The staging and blocking have been done very creatively. The film missed out on certain wide-angle shots which could have been possible with a professional camera.

Overall, Fursat is a beautifully-crafted short film that is both visually stunning and emotionally engaging. Highly recommended for fans of Indian cinema and short films in general.

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Satish Bhatia is a freelance producer, director and cinematographer for various national and international channels. He has won several awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award from Western India Cinematographers Association.

Satish Bhatia

Satish Bhatia is a freelance producer, director and cinematographer for various national and international channels. He has won several awards including the Lifetime Achievement Award from Western India Cinematographers Association.