Get Yourself Covered!

Young woman drinking a cup of herbal Ayurvedic tea
© Master1305 & Kamran Aydinov / Freepik.com

Dark and gloomy, grey skies and the occasional rumble of thunder signal the start of the much-awaited monsoon season. The monsoons always bring refreshing rain and much-needed relief from the sweltering summer. However, along with it also comes a spectrum of health woes from seasonal colds, flu, and typhoid to malaria, dengue and stomach infections, thus distressing one’s overall health.

A lowered immune system is one of the main reasons for common monsoon-related diseases, thus we need to ensure that the food we eat strikes a balance between nutrition and immunity.

Ancient ayurvedic practices state that in order to stay healthy throughout the year, one must follow the Ritucharya.

What is Ritucharya?

Ritucharya is comprised of two words: Ritu (season) and Charya (regimen or discipline).

As per Ayurveda, Varsha Ritu (rainy season) falls in the month of Shravan and Bhadrapada (mid-July to mid-September). When the sun sets, the heat that’s stored in the Earth is released as rain. During this season, almost all the doshas go out of balance and that is why Ayurveda strongly recommends seasonal purification.

According to Ayurveda, a person’s health is based on their doshas — a balance of the five elements of the world, i.e., air (vayu), space (akash), water (jala), earth (prithvi) and fire (teja). A combination of each element results in three doshas known as vata, kapha and pitta. These doshas are said to command a person’s physical, mental and emotional well-being.

Cover of the July 2022 issue of The Teenager Today featuring boxer Nikhat Zareen

Subscribe to The Teenager Today print / digital editions to read the full article.

Sharleen Zacharia is a trained Nutritionist with a Master’s degree in Foods, Nutrition and Dietetics.

Sharleen Zacharia

Sharleen Zacharia is a trained Nutritionist with a Master’s degree in Foods, Nutrition and Dietetics.